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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

By | February 17, 2016

What does blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging actually tell us about brain activity? 

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image: More Mini Brains

More Mini Brains

By | February 17, 2016

Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Fighting Back

Fighting Back

By | February 1, 2016

Plants can’t run away from attackers, so they’ve evolved unique immune defenses to protect themselves.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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image: Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

By | February 1, 2016

Scientists perform plant-genome modifications on crops without using plasmids.

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image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.

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image: Hydropowered Pollen

Hydropowered Pollen

By | February 1, 2016

A tension-sensing ion channel regulates hydration and germination in pollen.

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image: Mendel in the Hot Seat, 1902

Mendel in the Hot Seat, 1902

By | February 1, 2016

Raphael Weldon’s critiques of Mendelian principles were 100 years ahead of his time.

5 Comments

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