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image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

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image: Bumblebees Pick Infected Tomato Plants

Bumblebees Pick Infected Tomato Plants

By | August 11, 2016

Tomatoes infected with cucumber mosaic virus lure the pollinators, according to a study.

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image: The Badger-Cow TB Connection

The Badger-Cow TB Connection

By | August 5, 2016

Researchers in the U.K. report that badgers may be passing tuberculosis to farm animals not through direct contact, as was previously suspected, but through exposure to urine and feces.

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Researchers reveal how seals affect vegetation patterns and influence the movement of feral horse populations on Sable Island in Canada.

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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A chloroplast mutation has dramatically affected the genomes of railside populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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image: Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

By | July 28, 2016

Genomic analysis reveals wolves and coyotes have hybridized, potentially complicating wolves' protection under the US Endangered Species Act.

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image: Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

By | July 25, 2016

The partnering of an alga and a fungus to make lichen may be only two-thirds of the equation.

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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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