The Scientist

» plant biology and immunology

Most Recent

image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

3 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 8, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: Petunia pH

Petunia pH

By | January 5, 2014

A mutation in a gene that helps regulate the acidity of vacuoles gives blue petunias their signature color.

0 Comments

image: Avoiding Salt

Avoiding Salt

By | January 1, 2014

In a newly identified tropism, plant roots steer clear of salinity.

0 Comments

image: Green Gold

Green Gold

By | January 1, 2014

It’s been decades since researchers confirmed the presence of gold in plants, but biogeochemical prospecting has yet to catch on.

1 Comment

image: Stranger than Fiction

Stranger than Fiction

By | January 1, 2014

Plant biology: You can't make this stuff up.

1 Comment

image: Genomes Gone Wild

Genomes Gone Wild

By | January 1, 2014

Weird and wonderful, plant DNA is challenging preconceptions about the evolution of life, including our own species.

6 Comments

image: Plant Talk

Plant Talk

By | January 1, 2014

Plants communicate and interact with each other, both aboveground and below, in surprisingly subtle and sophisticated ways.

2 Comments

image: How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

By | December 19, 2013

During HIV infection, CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues initiate a highly inflammatory form of cell death that helps cripple the immune system.  

1 Comment

image: On The Origin of Flowers

On The Origin of Flowers

By | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech