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» plant biology and immunology

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Plants Without Plastid Genomes

Plants Without Plastid Genomes

By | February 28, 2014

Two independent teams point to different plants that may have lost their plastid genomes.

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

1 Comment

image: Jumping Hosts

Jumping Hosts

By | January 30, 2014

A single amino acid change helps a plant pathogen related to the causative agent of the Irish potato famine infect a new host.

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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

3 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 8, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Petunia pH

Petunia pH

By | January 5, 2014

A mutation in a gene that helps regulate the acidity of vacuoles gives blue petunias their signature color.

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