The Scientist

» plant biology and culture

Most Recent

image: Jumping Hosts

Jumping Hosts

By | January 30, 2014

A single amino acid change helps a plant pathogen related to the causative agent of the Irish potato famine infect a new host.

0 Comments

image: Review: “Green Porno”

Review: “Green Porno”

By | January 29, 2014

Isabella Rossellini explores nature’s kinky side in a one-woman show.

0 Comments

image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

3 Comments

image: Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

By | January 16, 2014

A pair of one-act chamber operas takes the audience inside the world of imagined sound. 

0 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 8, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: Petunia pH

Petunia pH

By | January 5, 2014

A mutation in a gene that helps regulate the acidity of vacuoles gives blue petunias their signature color.

0 Comments

image: A Ribbeting Tale

A Ribbeting Tale

By | January 1, 2014

A famous frog-hopping contest yields data that challenge previous lab estimates of how far a bullfrog can jump.

1 Comment

image: Avoiding Salt

Avoiding Salt

By | January 1, 2014

In a newly identified tropism, plant roots steer clear of salinity.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2014

Are Dolphins Really Smart?, Newton's Football, Outsider Scientists, and We Are Our Brains

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS