The Scientist

» plant biology and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Fighting Microbes with Microbes

By | January 1, 2013

Doctors turn to good microbes to fight disease. Will the same strategy work with crops?

6 Comments

image: Staying in Touch

Staying in Touch

By | January 1, 2013

Searching for life beyond our teeming planet has led to some innovative collaborative approaches to generating knowledge right here at home.

1 Comment

image: Steal My Sunshine

Steal My Sunshine

By | January 1, 2013

How photosynthetic organisms get taken up, passed around, and discarded throughout the eukaryotic domain

6 Comments

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Evolving CO2-Hungry Crops

Opinion: Evolving CO2-Hungry Crops

By , and | December 4, 2012

Breeding plants that can convert more carbon dioxide to food could help feed a growing population.

1 Comment

image: How Plants Feel

How Plants Feel

By | December 1, 2012

A hormone called jasmonate mediates plants' responses to touch and can boost defenses against pests.

1 Comment

image: Coconut Gene Bank Threatened

Coconut Gene Bank Threatened

By | November 13, 2012

A deadly bacterial disease is knocking at the door of a crucial collection of coconut palms in Papua New Guinea.

0 Comments

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

0 Comments

Advertisement
RayBiotech
RayBiotech

Popular Now

  1. Staying Active in the Lab
    Careers Staying Active in the Lab

    Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.

  2. When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
  3. The Lies That Scars Tell
    Notebook The Lies That Scars Tell

    Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist