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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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image: Next Generation: Nanoparticles Augment Plant Functions

Next Generation: Nanoparticles Augment Plant Functions

By | March 16, 2014

The incorporation of synthetic nanoparticles into plants can enhance photosynthesis and transform leaves into biochemical sensors.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Positive Developments on the HIV Front

Positive Developments on the HIV Front

By | March 7, 2014

A gene-editing protocol shows promise, and a second baby who was started on antiretroviral drugs soon after birth appears to be virus-free a year later.

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image: High Protein, High Risk?

High Protein, High Risk?

By | March 6, 2014

Low-protein diets are linked to longer life spans in mice and humans.

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: Plants Without Plastid Genomes

Plants Without Plastid Genomes

By | February 28, 2014

Two independent teams point to different plants that may have lost their plastid genomes.

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image: For Whom the Biomarkers Toll?

For Whom the Biomarkers Toll?

By | February 27, 2014

Study finds that a handful of biological indicators can predict a healthy person’s risk of dying within five years.

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