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image: Petunia pH

Petunia pH

By | January 5, 2014

A mutation in a gene that helps regulate the acidity of vacuoles gives blue petunias their signature color.

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image: Avoiding Salt

Avoiding Salt

By | January 1, 2014

In a newly identified tropism, plant roots steer clear of salinity.

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image: Elder Pharmacology

Elder Pharmacology

By | January 1, 2014

Studying and treating the chronic diseases associated with aging needs serious revamping.

5 Comments

image: Green Gold

Green Gold

By | January 1, 2014

It’s been decades since researchers confirmed the presence of gold in plants, but biogeochemical prospecting has yet to catch on.

1 Comment

image: Outwitting the Perfect Pathogen

Outwitting the Perfect Pathogen

By | January 1, 2014

Tuberculosis is exquisitely adapted to the human body. Researchers need a new game plan for beating it.

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image: Stranger than Fiction

Stranger than Fiction

By | January 1, 2014

Plant biology: You can't make this stuff up.

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image: Genomes Gone Wild

Genomes Gone Wild

By | January 1, 2014

Weird and wonderful, plant DNA is challenging preconceptions about the evolution of life, including our own species.

6 Comments

image: Plant Talk

Plant Talk

By | January 1, 2014

Plants communicate and interact with each other, both aboveground and below, in surprisingly subtle and sophisticated ways.

2 Comments

image: Flu Vaccine-Narcolepsy Link Explained?

Flu Vaccine-Narcolepsy Link Explained?

By | December 20, 2013

A new study sheds light on why those who received GlaxoSmithKline’s flu vaccine were at an increased risk of developing the sleep disorder.

4 Comments

image: How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

By | December 19, 2013

During HIV infection, CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues initiate a highly inflammatory form of cell death that helps cripple the immune system.  

1 Comment

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