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image: On Race and Medicine

On Race and Medicine

By | February 1, 2014

Until health care becomes truly personalized, race and ethnicity will continue to be important clues guiding medical treatments.

2 Comments

image: Pain and Progress

Pain and Progress

By | February 1, 2014

Is it possible to make a nonaddictive opioid painkiller?

1 Comment

image: Syphilis: Then and Now

Syphilis: Then and Now

By , , and | February 1, 2014

Researchers are zeroing in on the origin of syphilis and related diseases, which continue to plague the human population some 500 years after the first documented case.

12 Comments

image: Jumping Hosts

Jumping Hosts

By | January 30, 2014

A single amino acid change helps a plant pathogen related to the causative agent of the Irish potato famine infect a new host.

0 Comments

image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.

0 Comments

image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #3

The Scientist on The Pulse #3

By | January 28, 2014

Kerry Grens chats about ancient tooth decay, asthma, and fat cells.

0 Comments

image: Person-to-Person H7N9?

Person-to-Person H7N9?

By | January 20, 2014

The death of a medical worker in China prompts worries that the virus can spread between humans.

0 Comments

image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

1 Comment

image: Next Generation: Capturing the Body’s Energy

Next Generation: Capturing the Body’s Energy

By | January 20, 2014

Researchers build a device that harvests and stores energy from the mechanical movements of a beating heart.

1 Comment

image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

3 Comments

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