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» plant biology, evolution and microbiology

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: Nibbled? No Problem

Nibbled? No Problem

By | February 1, 2015

Making extra copies of their genomes allows some plants to better withstand damage.

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

By | January 29, 2015

A mass migration of mobile regulatory elements increased the expression of thousands of genes in the uterus during the evolution of pregnancy.

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image: UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

By | January 28, 2015

Using ultraviolet light to disinfect drinking water may simply drive bacteria to dormancy, rather than kill them.

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image: America’s First Pooches

America’s First Pooches

By | January 27, 2015

Study of ancient dog DNA sheds light on early Americans’ relationships with their pets.

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image: GMO “Kill Switches”

GMO “Kill Switches”

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists design bacteria reliant upon synthetic amino acids to contain genetically modified organisms.

6 Comments

image: Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

By | January 21, 2015

A point mutation analysis of the entire human genome finds that alterations to as many as 7.5 percent of nucleotides may have contributed to humans’ evolutionary split from chimpanzees.

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