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image: Vanishing Batteries

Vanishing Batteries

By | March 26, 2014

Researchers describe a major component of biodegradable implants.

1 Comment

image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, March 21

The Scientist on The Pulse, March 21

By | March 24, 2014

Big Bang ripples, ancient moss revived, and lab-made heart tissue

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: March 17–21

Week in Review: March 17–21

By | March 21, 2014

Protein appears to protect stressed neurons; vitamin A’s lifelong effects on immunity; stem cells influenced by substrates; supercharged photosynthesis through nanotechnology

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image: Next Generation: Nanoparticles Augment Plant Functions

Next Generation: Nanoparticles Augment Plant Functions

By | March 16, 2014

The incorporation of synthetic nanoparticles into plants can enhance photosynthesis and transform leaves into biochemical sensors.

2 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | March 12, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Positive Developments on the HIV Front

Positive Developments on the HIV Front

By | March 7, 2014

A gene-editing protocol shows promise, and a second baby who was started on antiretroviral drugs soon after birth appears to be virus-free a year later.

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image: High Protein, High Risk?

High Protein, High Risk?

By | March 6, 2014

Low-protein diets are linked to longer life spans in mice and humans.

7 Comments

image: Convergent Fish Fins

Convergent Fish Fins

By | March 5, 2014

Adipose fins, long considered vestigial, may have evolved multiple times as a key adaptation in some fish, study finds.

1 Comment

image: Flashy Deep Sea Fish

Flashy Deep Sea Fish

By | March 5, 2014

Fish with complex light-emitting photophore patterns may be primed to split into new species.

0 Comments

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