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image: Putting Up Resistance

Putting Up Resistance

By | June 1, 2014

Will the public swallow science’s best solution to one of the most dangerous wheat pathogens on the planet?

7 Comments

image: Week in Review: March 31–April 4

Week in Review: March 31–April 4

By | April 4, 2014

Transcriptional landscape of the fetal brain; how a parasitic worm invades plants; difficulties reproducing “breakthrough” heart regeneration method; oxytocin and dishonesty

1 Comment

image: Worm Subverts Plant Attack

Worm Subverts Plant Attack

By | April 3, 2014

A parasitic nematode relies on a plant’s defense mechanism to invade and grow.

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image: Elusive Receptor ID’d

Elusive Receptor ID’d

By | April 1, 2014

Scientists identify an extracellular ATP receptor in plants.

0 Comments

image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, March 21

The Scientist on The Pulse, March 21

By | March 24, 2014

Big Bang ripples, ancient moss revived, and lab-made heart tissue

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: March 17–21

Week in Review: March 17–21

By | March 21, 2014

Protein appears to protect stressed neurons; vitamin A’s lifelong effects on immunity; stem cells influenced by substrates; supercharged photosynthesis through nanotechnology

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image: Next Generation: Nanoparticles Augment Plant Functions

Next Generation: Nanoparticles Augment Plant Functions

By | March 16, 2014

The incorporation of synthetic nanoparticles into plants can enhance photosynthesis and transform leaves into biochemical sensors.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

0 Comments

image: Plants Without Plastid Genomes

Plants Without Plastid Genomes

By | February 28, 2014

Two independent teams point to different plants that may have lost their plastid genomes.

1 Comment

image: Jumping Hosts

Jumping Hosts

By | January 30, 2014

A single amino acid change helps a plant pathogen related to the causative agent of the Irish potato famine infect a new host.

0 Comments

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