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» deafness, neuroscience and culture

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Brainspotting

By | December 1, 2011

New, minimally invasive techniques for seeing deep inside living brains

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image: Citizen Science Goes Marine

Citizen Science Goes Marine

By | November 30, 2011

A new public science project asks people at home to match whale songs in hopes of better understanding their language.

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How Are We Doing?

By | November 29, 2011

Let us know what you like about The Scientist, and how we can improve our coverage of the life sciences.

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image: Psychopathic Pathology

Psychopathic Pathology

By | November 28, 2011

The brains of psychopaths have a different structure than healthy brains, perhaps explaining their antisocial and impulsive behaviors.

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image: Seeing Sound

Seeing Sound

By | November 22, 2011

Researchers ask: Is there an advantage to getting emotional when touching certain textures, or seeing colors change when you listen to music?

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image: Science Avoids Big Budget Cuts

Science Avoids Big Budget Cuts

By | November 22, 2011

Congress has passed a spending bill that spares some of the country’s biggest science agencies from the worst of the deficit-reduction measures.

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image: Chronic Fatigue Researcher Arrested

Chronic Fatigue Researcher Arrested

By | November 21, 2011

Judy Mikovits, notorious in the scientific community since she claimed to link a mouse retrovirus to chronic fatigue syndrome, has been arrested and is being held in jail.

30 Comments

image: Deafness Gene Heightens Touch

Deafness Gene Heightens Touch

By | November 20, 2011

People with a defect in an ion channel that causes deafness are more sensitive to certain types of touch.

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image: The Call of the Finding

The Call of the Finding

By | November 18, 2011

Some are worried that psychologists have become addicted to sound-bite results.

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image: Snake Toxin Reveals Pain Clues

Snake Toxin Reveals Pain Clues

By | November 16, 2011

The venom from the Texas coral snake causes intense pain by targeting acid-sensing ion channels, providing researchers with potential new targets for pain therapies.

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Mettler Toledo
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