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image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: Psychiatry: An SOS Call

Psychiatry: An SOS Call

By | May 1, 2014

Social policies shaped the practice of psychiatry in the past. As the discipline becomes ever more scientific, the effects of social policy on patient well-being must not be ignored.

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image: The Crowd Takes On the Computer

The Crowd Takes On the Computer

By | May 1, 2014

Gangs of nonexperts are outperforming science’s best efforts at automating biological problem solving.

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image: The Skin We’re In

The Skin We’re In

By | May 1, 2014

Beneath maladies of the skin lie psychosocial stigma and pain.

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image: Your Brain on Art

Your Brain on Art

By | May 1, 2014

A new scientific discipline investigates the neurology underlying the experience and the creation of beauty.

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image: Neuroaesthetics

Neuroaesthetics

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.

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image: The Art of Brain Damage

The Art of Brain Damage

By | May 1, 2014

Artist Katherine Sherwood discuss how suffering a cerebral hemorrhage affected her work.

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image: Another Way Fiber Is Filling

Another Way Fiber Is Filling

By | April 29, 2014

Acetate, a short-chain fatty acid released following the fermentation of dietary fiber in the gut, accumulates in the brain and can affect appetite in mice.

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image: Genetic Brain Disorder Explained

Genetic Brain Disorder Explained

By | April 25, 2014

Researchers uncover a mutation responsible for a rare neurological condition.

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image: Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

Cochlear Implant Gene Therapy

By | April 23, 2014

The surgically implanted device can be tweaked to provide short electric bursts that send a nerve-growing gene into local cells, a study on guinea pigs shows.

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