The Scientist

» deafness, developmental biology and ecology

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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Icy Algae in a Changing Arctic

By | February 14, 2013

New research adds to an emerging picture of the changes that global warming and thinning ice are wreaking on the marine ecosystems at the top of the world.

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Sampling the New Arctic

By | February 14, 2013

Scenes from a research trip, where researchers peered beneath the ice to shine a light on the emerging picture of a changing Arctic Ocean

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Diversity Defeats Disease

By | February 13, 2013

In a pond, more amphibian species mean decreased chances of disease spread.

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image: Dual Adaptation in Deaf Brains

Dual Adaptation in Deaf Brains

By | February 12, 2013

The brains of people who cannot hear adapt to process vision-based language, in addition to brain changes associated with the loss of auditory input. 

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Oil Additive Harming Seabirds

By | February 8, 2013

Scientists have identified the sticky substance that is damaging the feathers of hundreds seabirds washed ashore in England as an additive for lubricant oils.  

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Opinion: Paradoxical Amphibians

By | February 7, 2013

New amphibian species are being discovered at an exciting rate, yet they are also the vertebrates most at risk of extinction.

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Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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Frogcicle

By | February 1, 2013

Watch as the astounding wood frog uses cellular cryopreservation tricks to freeze, thaw, and live to croak about it.

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