The Scientist

» deafness, evolution and developmental biology

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Opinion: Cooperating to Study Cooperation

Opinion: Cooperating to Study Cooperation

By | February 20, 2013

Physicists and biologists are working together to understand cooperation at all levels of life, from the cohesion of molecules to interspecies interactions.

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image: Appendix Not Totally Useless

Appendix Not Totally Useless

By | February 15, 2013

The small organ evolved too many times for it to be an accident, but it’s still unclear what it does.

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image: Dual Adaptation in Deaf Brains

Dual Adaptation in Deaf Brains

By | February 12, 2013

The brains of people who cannot hear adapt to process vision-based language, in addition to brain changes associated with the loss of auditory input. 

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image: Placental Ancestor Found

Placental Ancestor Found

By | February 11, 2013

A small insect-eating animal is the common ancestor of whales, elephants, dogs, and humans.

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Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Freezing Cells

Freezing Cells

By | February 1, 2013

A handful of species have learned how to survive in freezing climates. To do so, the animals must counteract the damaging effects of ice crystal formation, or keep from freezing altogether. Here are a few ways they do it.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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