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image: CRISPR Can Tag RNA

CRISPR Can Tag RNA

By | March 21, 2016

Modifications to the DNA-slicing program allow for monitoring the movement of messenger RNA.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Managing Methylation

Managing Methylation

By | January 1, 2016

A long noncoding RNA associated with DNA methylation has the power to regulate colon cancer growth in vitro.

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image: RNA Epigenetics

RNA Epigenetics

By , and | January 1, 2016

DNA isn’t the only decorated nucleic acid in the cell. Modifications to RNA molecules are much more common and are critical for regulating diverse biological processes.

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image: RNA Methylation Dynamics

RNA Methylation Dynamics

By , and | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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