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A case study reports evidence of viral replication lingering in the respiratory tract of an infected person, even after the person’s blood was Ebola free.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: Historical Hunts

Historical Hunts

By | January 1, 2017

See images from a century of fur trapping and hunting in the Amazon basin.

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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image: Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

By | December 1, 2016

Researchers discover diverse communities of invertebrates inhabiting the water-filled tracks of elephants in Uganda.

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image: Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend

Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend

By | November 1, 2016

Barcodes of mRNA travel to the cells' axon terminals, offering a sequencing-based approach to neural mapping.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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image: How to Track Translation in Living Cells

How to Track Translation in Living Cells

By | October 1, 2016

Four independent research groups develop techniques for visualizing peptide production in living cells.

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image: Ocean Viruses Cataloged

Ocean Viruses Cataloged

By | September 21, 2016

An international research team triples the number of known virus types found in marine environments. 

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