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image: Week in Review: June 22–26

Week in Review: June 22–26

By | June 26, 2015

Neanderthal-human hybrid discovered; the neurobiology of fear behavior; and an insulin patch that responds to high glucose levels in mice

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image: The Brain on Fear

The Brain on Fear

By | June 25, 2015

Scientists uncover the neurons in the mouse brain responsible for linking the sight of a looming object to scared behavior.

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image: Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

By | June 15, 2015

This helps the insects collect as much visual information as possible from the gently swaying flowers on which they dine.

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image: TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

By | June 12, 2015

Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur

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image: The Roots of Schizophrenia

The Roots of Schizophrenia

By | June 4, 2015

Researchers link disease-associated mutations to excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain.

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Legs to Stand On

New Legs to Stand On

By | June 1, 2015

Reconstructing the past using ancient DNA

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