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Horizon Discovery
Horizon Discovery

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» anthropology and developmental biology

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image: Syphilis: Then and Now

Syphilis: Then and Now

By , , and | February 1, 2014

Researchers are zeroing in on the origin of syphilis and related diseases, which continue to plague the human population some 500 years after the first documented case.

12 Comments

image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

By | December 4, 2013

A 400,000-year-old mitochondrial genome adds new twists to scientists’ picture of early human evolution.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: Ye Old Parasites

Ye Old Parasites

By | November 1, 2013

Evidence of early-13th-century intestinal worms found in a medieval castle latrine yields clues about the lives and deaths of crusaders.

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image: European Roots for Native Americans?

European Roots for Native Americans?

By | October 29, 2013

An analysis of ancient DNA from a 24,000-year-old Siberian skeleton generates a new model for the original peopling of the Western Hemisphere.

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Ancient Georgian Ancestors

Ancient Georgian Ancestors

By | October 17, 2013

A hominin skull found in Dmanisi reveals that human ancestors migrating from Africa were more primitive than once thought.

5 Comments

image: A Hole in the Head

A Hole in the Head

By | September 30, 2013

Scientists show that the position of the foramen magnum, the hole in the skull through which the spine connects to the brain, is correlated with locomotion and posture in mammals.

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