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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Legs to Stand On

New Legs to Stand On

By | June 1, 2015

Reconstructing the past using ancient DNA

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

By | May 29, 2015

Using optogenetics, researchers excite selected neurons to reinstate a fear memory that had been blocked.

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image: A New Human Ancestor?

A New Human Ancestor?

By | May 28, 2015

Researchers in Ethiopia unearth a previously unknown species of hominin, which roamed Africa at the same time as “Lucy.”

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image: Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

By | May 27, 2015

People with a congenital disorder that makes them unable to feel pain have mutations in a histone-modifying gene. 

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image: Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

By | May 26, 2015

Researchers unearth 3.3 million-year-old stone flakes in Kenya, forcing a reimagining of the emergence of such technologies in the ancestors of humans.

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image: Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

By | May 21, 2015

Squid, cuttlefish, and octopuses possess vision machinery in their skin.

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