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Scientists are criticizing the claim that hominins were in North America more than 100,000 years earlier than the currently accepted estimation.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Monkey Tools and Early Human Ingenuity

Monkey Tools and Early Human Ingenuity

By | October 25, 2016

Wild capuchin monkeys in Brazil produce sharp stone flakes by accident, causing some researchers to suggest a rethink of the beginnings of human tool use.

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image: The Neanderthal in the Mirror

The Neanderthal in the Mirror

By | August 1, 2016

Our evolutionary cousin is no longer a blundering caveman. Recent research has painted a picture of a human ancestor with culture, art, and advanced cognitive skills.

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image: US Government to Repatriate Kennewick Man

US Government to Repatriate Kennewick Man

By | April 29, 2016

A 2015 ancient DNA study determined that the 8,500-year-old skeletal remains belonged to an individual of Native American ancestry. Now, the US Army Corp of Engineers has begun the process of returning the bones to their rightful owners.

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image: Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

By | November 19, 2015

The ancient genomes of 50,000-year-old Denisovan teeth suggest the extinct species lived alongside Neanderthals and modern humans.

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image: Review: Sacred Stories, Genetic Privacy Collide

Review: Sacred Stories, Genetic Privacy Collide

By | August 17, 2015

Cherished myths and merciless facts clash in a one-act play.

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image: The First Americans

The First Americans

By | July 23, 2015

Two genetic studies seeking to determine how people first migrated to North and South America yield different results.

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image: Our Primitive Hands

Our Primitive Hands

By | July 15, 2015

New research suggests that the form of the human hand has been around for a lot longer than previously thought.

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image: TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

By | June 12, 2015

Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur

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