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image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

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image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

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image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

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image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Italian Stem Cell Trial Stopped

Italian Stem Cell Trial Stopped

By | October 11, 2013

With support from scientists, Italy’s health minister halts a controversial clinical trial.

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image: UK Badger Cull Begins

UK Badger Cull Begins

By | August 27, 2013

British officials hope that killing badgers will slow the spread of bovine tuberculosis.

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image: Week in Review, July 22–26

Week in Review, July 22–26

By | July 26, 2013

Faux stem cells; X chromosome involved in sperm production; rewarding peer review; clues to flatworm regeneration; an ethereal glow signals death

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image: A Wild Stem Cell Chase

A Wild Stem Cell Chase

By | July 24, 2013

A rigorous new study provides strong evidence that very small embryonic-like stem cells hypothesized to be found in mice and humans do not exist.

1 Comment

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