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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

By | December 1, 2015

Warning signs that scandal might be brewing in your lab  

5 Comments

image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

1 Comment

image: Lab-Made Coronavirus Triggers Debate

Lab-Made Coronavirus Triggers Debate

By | November 16, 2015

The creation of a chimeric SARS-like virus has scientists discussing the risks of gain-of-function research.

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image: Following the Funding

Following the Funding

By | November 4, 2015

Researchers use network theory to estimate the importance of relationships among researchers and institutions in attracting grant money.

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image: European Brain Project Extended

European Brain Project Extended

By | November 3, 2015

The European Commission has agreed to add three years of funding to the Human Brain Project, which has had its detractors since launching in 2013.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: 2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By and | November 1, 2015

This year’s survey highlights dramatic regional, sector, and gender variations.

13 Comments

image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

0 Comments

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