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» controversy and cell & molecular biology

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image: Deep Tissue Treatment

Deep Tissue Treatment

By | September 1, 2011

A new, genetically encoded tag for electron microscopy may revolutionize studies of specific proteins in cells and tissues.

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image: Ribosomes in Control

Ribosomes in Control

By | September 1, 2011

Editor’s Choice in Cell Biology

6 Comments

image: Hiding Under a Cap

Hiding Under a Cap

By | August 30, 2011

Editor's Choice in Immunology

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image: Bacteria Kamikazes

Bacteria Kamikazes

By | August 16, 2011

Researchers design a synthetic bacterium that kills the infectious microbe Pseudomonas aeruginosa, sacrificing itself in the process.

21 Comments

image: How Caffeine Fights Cancer

How Caffeine Fights Cancer

By | August 15, 2011

Caffeinated drinks may help prevent skin cancer by inhibiting a DNA repair pathway, thus killing potentially precancerous cells.

12 Comments

image: Designing Worm Proteins

Designing Worm Proteins

By | August 15, 2011

For the first time, researchers have engineered a multicellular organism that incorporates a synthetic amino acid into its proteins.

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image: Cancer Researcher Fabricated Data

Cancer Researcher Fabricated Data

By | August 11, 2011

Sheng Wang leaves the Boston University School of Medicine and agrees to retract two published studies.

60 Comments

image: Baruj Benacerraf Dies

Baruj Benacerraf Dies

By | August 3, 2011

The Nobel Prize winner who discovered the gene that encodes the major histocompatibility complex passes away at age 90.

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image: Hungry Neurons = Hungry Person

Hungry Neurons = Hungry Person

By | August 2, 2011

Starving brain cells can stimulate hunger through a common cannibalistic act, possibly explaining why some dieters can’t resist temptation.

12 Comments

image: Helpful Bacterial Metabolites

Helpful Bacterial Metabolites

By | August 1, 2011

While gut microbiota appear to have both positive and negative impacts on our  health, in the guts of healthy, lean individuals, the good outweighs the bad.  

3 Comments

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