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image: More Trouble for Nevada Institute

More Trouble for Nevada Institute

By | January 31, 2012

The founders of the Institute that housed chronic fatigue researcher Judy Mikovits are being sued for embezzlement.

3 Comments

image: H5N1 Researcher Speaks Out

H5N1 Researcher Speaks Out

By | January 26, 2012

Japanese virologist Yoshihiro Kawaoka, who led one of the recent studies on avian flu transmissibility, says that type of research is necessary.

9 Comments

image: Longevity Study Lives On

Longevity Study Lives On

By | January 24, 2012

A reanalysis of the study reporting genes linked to extremely long life, which was retracted from Science last summer, is published in PLoS ONE.

3 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Nobel Winner’s Contribution Questioned

Nobel Winner’s Contribution Questioned

By | December 19, 2011

A coauthor of the key paper that led to one of this year’s Nobel Prizes for Physiology or Medicine claims the recipient wasn’t involved in the research.

15 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

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