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image: Italian Stem Cell Trial Stopped

Italian Stem Cell Trial Stopped

By | October 11, 2013

With support from scientists, Italy’s health minister halts a controversial clinical trial.

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image: UK Badger Cull Begins

UK Badger Cull Begins

By | August 27, 2013

British officials hope that killing badgers will slow the spread of bovine tuberculosis.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 22–26

Week in Review, July 22–26

By | July 26, 2013

Faux stem cells; X chromosome involved in sperm production; rewarding peer review; clues to flatworm regeneration; an ethereal glow signals death

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image: A Wild Stem Cell Chase

A Wild Stem Cell Chase

By | July 24, 2013

A rigorous new study provides strong evidence that very small embryonic-like stem cells hypothesized to be found in mice and humans do not exist.

1 Comment

image: Italian Stem Cell Controversy

Italian Stem Cell Controversy

By | July 16, 2013

Italian government officials and scientists clashed last week with a controversial stem cell researcher over details of an upcoming clinical trial.

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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

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image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

1 Comment

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