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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Galileo’s Middle Finger</em>

Book Excerpt from Galileo’s Middle Finger

By | March 10, 2015

In Chapter 4, “A Show-Me State of Mind,” author Alice Dreger describes the start of her journey studying scientists who had conducted controversial research.

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image: Is Anatomy Destiny?

Is Anatomy Destiny?

By | March 1, 2015

Alice Dreger, historian of science and author of this month's "Reading Frames," explores the blurry lines between male and female in her 2010 TED talk.

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image: Stirring the Pot

Stirring the Pot

By | March 1, 2015

How to navigate the slings and arrows of conducting “controversial” research


image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.


image: Top Science Scandals of 2014

Top Science Scandals of 2014

By | December 25, 2014

The stem cell that never was; post-publication peer review website faces legal trouble; biosecurity breaches at federal labs


image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.


image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.


image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.


image: Week in Review: October 13–17

Week in Review: October 13–17

By | October 17, 2014

Snail not extinct after all; results too good to be true?; mice need myelin production for motor learning; keeping the brain young; the evolution of archaea



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