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image: GM Crop Field Intruder Arrested

GM Crop Field Intruder Arrested

By | May 22, 2012

A protestor is arrested for trying to break into a field of genetically modified wheat at a UK agricultural research station.

2 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

0 Comments

image: Mighty Moth Man

Mighty Moth Man

By | May 1, 2012

An evolutionary biologist’s posthumous publication restores the peppered moth to its iconic status as a textbook example of evolution.

22 Comments

image: White House Weighs in on H5N1

White House Weighs in on H5N1

By | April 18, 2012

Science adviser John Holdren speaks out about how the Presidential Administration is handling the controversial research that rendered avian flu transmissible between ferrets.

0 Comments

image: H5N1 Researcher to Defy Dutch Gov’t?

H5N1 Researcher to Defy Dutch Gov’t?

By | April 18, 2012

A virologist at the center of avian flu research controversy says he’ll publish without government permits.

4 Comments

image: Plant RNA Paper Questioned

Plant RNA Paper Questioned

By | April 16, 2012

Remarkable findings of ingested plant miRNA in animal liver and blood draw speculation about the study’s validity.

42 Comments

image: The Two Faces of Metastasis

The Two Faces of Metastasis

By | April 1, 2012

During development, the cells of an embryo change their pattern of gene expression, which allows them to detach from their original location and migrate to another part of the embryo, where the pattern changes again to allow formation of a new organ.

0 Comments

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