The Scientist

» controversy and ecology

Most Recent

image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

0 Comments

image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

0 Comments

image: Closing the Case on STAP?

Closing the Case on STAP?

By | September 23, 2015

Several reports offer an inside look into the stem-cell research controversy.

0 Comments

image: Tide Shifting on Embryo Gene Editing?

Tide Shifting on Embryo Gene Editing?

By | September 11, 2015

An international bioethics group says that research that involves editing genes in human embryos can be valuable, though it doesn’t approve of making “designer babies.”

0 Comments

image: Censored Professor Quits

Censored Professor Quits

By | August 27, 2015

Alice Dreger is resigning from the faculty of Northwestern University, claiming that the administration censored her work in a faculty journal.

3 Comments

image: Citation Payola?

Citation Payola?

By | August 18, 2015

A transgenic mouse company is paying researchers who mention its animal models in scientific papers.

1 Comment

image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

0 Comments

image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot
  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms’ Stock Warranted?
AAAS