The Scientist

» cell culture and developmental biology

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Seeded by Weeds

By | May 1, 2015

More than 50 years after cross-contamination of cultured cell lines was recognized, the problem continues to plague the scientific community.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Stemming Genetic Changes in Cultured Cells

Stemming Genetic Changes in Cultured Cells

By | February 25, 2015

Researchers report an association between culture conditions and genetic changes in stem cells over time.

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image: Culturing Changes Cells

Culturing Changes Cells

By | February 3, 2015

Within days of their transfer to a dish, a certain epigenetic mark vanishes from mouse cells.

2 Comments

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Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

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