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image: Protein or Perish

Protein or Perish

By | September 1, 2016

A bacteriophage must evolve certain variants of a protein or die.


image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

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image: Antibiotic Resistance Reaches Brazil

Antibiotic Resistance Reaches Brazil

By | August 8, 2016

Scientists detect a colistin-resistance gene in a clinical sample.


image: The Badger-Cow TB Connection

The Badger-Cow TB Connection

By | August 5, 2016

Researchers in the U.K. report that badgers may be passing tuberculosis to farm animals not through direct contact, as was previously suspected, but through exposure to urine and feces.

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image: Fecal Transplant Pill Fails Trial

Fecal Transplant Pill Fails Trial

By | August 1, 2016

Seres Therapeutics’s microbiome-targeting therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection fails a Phase 2 clinical trial.


From sequencing bacteriophages to synthesizing bacterial genomes to defining a minimal genome


image: Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

By | August 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT. Age: 34

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By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.


Researchers reveal how seals affect vegetation patterns and influence the movement of feral horse populations on Sable Island in Canada.


image: Riboswitch Screen

Riboswitch Screen

By | August 1, 2016

A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.


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