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image: An Ear for Home

An Ear for Home

By | April 1, 2013

Pigeons may use ultra-low-frequency sounds to navigate—a strategy that could steer them off course in the face of infrasonic disturbances, such as sonic booms.


image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.


image: Speed-Sensitive Denticles

Speed-Sensitive Denticles

By | April 1, 2013

Tooth-like structures on the skin of a South American fish might serve as high-velocity water-flow detectors.


image: After Chemo

After Chemo

By | April 1, 2013

Research into how the brain suffers as a result of chemotherapy is revealing potential avenues for ameliorating cognitive decline.

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image: Brain Activity Predicts Re-arrest

Brain Activity Predicts Re-arrest

By | March 27, 2013

Researchers demonstrate that brain activity in response to a decision-making challenge predicts the likelihood that released prisoners will be re-arrested.


image: New Down Syndrome Protein Found

New Down Syndrome Protein Found

By | March 26, 2013

Researchers identify a protein involved in the chromosomal disorder that could explain its characteristic learning deficits.


image: Brain Activity Breaks DNA

Brain Activity Breaks DNA

By | March 24, 2013

Researchers find that temporary double-stranded DNA breaks commonly result from normal neuron activation—but expression of an Alzheimer’s-linked protein increases the damage.


image: Bridges for UK Water Voles

Bridges for UK Water Voles

By | March 20, 2013

Newly constructed ramps will expand the habitat available to a colony of water voles in London, and similar ramps elsewhere could encourage isolated populations to mix.   


image: Fish Brain on Film

Fish Brain on Film

By | March 19, 2013

Improvements in light-sheet microscopy enable real-time activity imaging of almost every neuron in the brain of zebrafish larvae.


image: Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

By | March 8, 2013

Native Australian frog tadpoles outcompete the tadpoles of the invasive cane toad, suggesting the native frogs could form part of a suburban control program.


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