The Scientist

» survey, cell & molecular biology and evolution

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image: Feeding Time

Feeding Time

By | February 1, 2013

The eating schedule—and not the amount of calories—can make the difference between an obese, diabetic, sick mouse and one with a healthy metabolism.


image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Freezing Cells

Freezing Cells

By | February 1, 2013

A handful of species have learned how to survive in freezing climates. To do so, the animals must counteract the damaging effects of ice crystal formation, or keep from freezing altogether. Here are a few ways they do it.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.


image: Photonic Colored Creatures

Photonic Colored Creatures

By | February 1, 2013

Animals and plants come in a dizzying array of colors. Current research is cracking into the remarkable structures behind nature's artistic display.

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image: Stockpiling Histones

Stockpiling Histones

By | February 1, 2013

Histones stored on lipid droplets in fly embryos provide a backup supply when newly synthesized ones are lacking.


image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.


image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.


image: Icing Organs

Icing Organs

By | February 1, 2013

Why scientists are so near and yet so far from being able to cryopreserve organs


image: Dogs Adapted to Agriculture

Dogs Adapted to Agriculture

By | January 23, 2013

As wolves became domesticated, their genes adapted to a starch-rich diet of human leftovers.



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