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image: Male Lineage Not Younger Than Females

Male Lineage Not Younger Than Females

By | August 2, 2013

Two genomic studies place the divergence of men from their most recent common ancestor nearer in time to that of women, though the field is far from a consensus.

1 Comment

image: BPTW: By the Numbers

BPTW: By the Numbers

By | August 1, 2013

Take a closer look at some of the statistics generated by The Scientist's Best Place to Work Academia 2013 survey.

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image: Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

By | August 1, 2013

Crescent, An Empty Land of Plenty, Prophet of Bones, and Equilateral

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | August 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Finding the Way

Finding the Way

By | August 1, 2013

A focus on the movements of species and disciplines through space, time, and minds

1 Comment

image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.

3 Comments

image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.

4 Comments

image: Keeping Up with Climate Change

Keeping Up with Climate Change

By | July 24, 2013

In order to adapt to this century’s changing temperatures, vertebrates will need to evolve much faster than in previous eras.

3 Comments

image: A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

By | July 18, 2013

The discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur supports the idea that similar but separate species evolved on the same landmass thanks to a natural barrier.  

1 Comment

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

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