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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Submit Your Favorite Innovation

Submit Your Favorite Innovation

By | April 12, 2016

With The Scientist’s Top 10 Innovations competition here again, it’s time to consider the best new life science tools, technologies, and methodologies. 

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image: Retracted Study’s Strategy Resurrected

Retracted Study’s Strategy Resurrected

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers replicate the methods used in a falsified 2014 study that claimed short, in-person conversations could sway attitudes on same-sex marriage, this time reporting that the technique worked on people initially opposed to transgender rights.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: The 2016 Salary Survey Is Here

The 2016 Salary Survey Is Here

By | March 18, 2016

Answer some brief questions and help us determine the most current salary outlook for life scientists and earn a chance to win a $100 Amazon gift card.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: The Scientific Outreach Gap

The Scientific Outreach Gap

By | December 7, 2015

A survey finds that arts, humanities, and social science faculty members in the U.K. engage more with the general public than their counterparts in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

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