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» survey and developmental biology

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

2 Comments

image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

1 Comment

image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

0 Comments

image: Lab Safety in the Spotlight

Lab Safety in the Spotlight

By | January 4, 2013

An international survey suggests that labs may not be safe as researchers think.

1 Comment

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Rate Your Workplace Today!

Rate Your Workplace Today!

By | November 9, 2012

Only two weeks left to participate in The Scientist’s 2013 survey for best place to work in the life sciences.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: PCR Usage and Preferences

PCR Usage and Preferences

By | November 1, 2012

Quantitative real-time technology dominates the market today but digital PCR is on the rise.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

0 Comments

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