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image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.

4 Comments

image: Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

By | February 7, 2013

Protein aggregates in the brains of some people with dementia or motor neuron disease have a surprising origin.

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image: Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

By | February 5, 2013

Tuberculosis bacteria find shelter from drugs and the body’s defenses in bone marrow stem cells.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Health Booth 2020

Opinion: Health Booth 2020

By | February 4, 2013

Using a SMART card containing your genetic information and medical history, you could one day soon be diagnosed and treated for all kinds of diseases at an ATM-style kiosk.

3 Comments

image: Genetics-Poverty Link Questioned

Genetics-Poverty Link Questioned

By | February 3, 2013

Harvard geneticists and anthropologists challenge the work of two economists who say there’s a link between genetic diversity and wealth.

1 Comment

image: Why Mice Like Massages

Why Mice Like Massages

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers pinpoint a gene marker for neurons sensitive to gentle touch such as grooming.

0 Comments

image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2013

The Science of Love, Bad Pharma, Genes, Cells and Brains, and Nature Wars

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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

2 Comments

image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

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