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No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

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Rate Your Workplace Today!

By | November 9, 2012

Only two weeks left to participate in The Scientist’s 2013 survey for best place to work in the life sciences.

0 Comments

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Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

1 Comment

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Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

1 Comment

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PCR Usage and Preferences

By | November 1, 2012

Quantitative real-time technology dominates the market today but digital PCR is on the rise.

0 Comments

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The Birthday Conference

By | November 1, 2012

Snapshots from an annual meeting that celebrates the birth of a prominent biologist

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A Celebrated Symposium

By | November 1, 2012

A conference, started 10 years ago partly as a disease ecologist’s birthday party, has become one of the most valued meetings in the field.  

0 Comments

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Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

0 Comments

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