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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Life Sciences Salary Survey 2012

Life Sciences Salary Survey 2012

By | November 1, 2012

Researcher salaries continue to buck the trend of the millennium’s first decade, remaining flat or even declining across most life science disciplines.

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Life Science Salaries

By | November 1, 2012

Check out the breakdown of this year's Salary Survey data, including how compensation differs between sex, sector, and state.

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image: Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

By | October 23, 2012

Genes from fungi, bacteria, and viruses may have helped mosses and other plants to colonize the land.

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image: Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

By | October 19, 2012

The blogosphere voices widespread condemnation for a sexist comment made by a researcher attending this week’s annual Society for Neuroscience conference.

8 Comments

image: Brain Scans Predict Reading Skills

Brain Scans Predict Reading Skills

By | October 9, 2012

New research shows that the growth of long-range connections between brain regions predicts how well a child will learn to read.

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image: Growing New Neurons

Growing New Neurons

By | October 4, 2012

Brain cells called pericytes can be reprogrammed into neurons with just two proteins, pointing to a novel way to treat neurodegenerative disorders.

5 Comments

image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…

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image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

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