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image: Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

By | December 2, 2016

The human lymph nodes and spleen maintain unique, compartmentalized sets of naive T cells well into old age.

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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Spruce and pine and have relied on similar genetic toolkits for climate adaptation despite millions of years of evolution.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: The Topography of Teeth

The Topography of Teeth

By | November 29, 2016

Intricate, digital maps of animals’ teeth, created using the same geographical tools used by mapmakers, may help researchers determine the diets of extinct species.

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image: Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

By | November 29, 2016

Life at the bottom of the pecking order ramps up inflammation, according to new research, an effect that appears to be reversible.

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image: More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

By | November 22, 2016

The International Human Epigenome Consortium presents a series of studies on how epigenetics influences immunity, cell lineage determination, and differentiation.

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image: Trumping Science?

Trumping Science?

By | November 11, 2016

How will the research enterprise fare under a Donald Trump administration? The scientific community reacts.

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image: Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

By | November 9, 2016

Natural selection may be behind the dearth of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans.

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image: Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

By | November 7, 2016

A mutation that appeared early in the 2014 outbreak made the virus more infectious in humans, scientists show.

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