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image: Snakebites Get DNA Fingerprint Treatment

Snakebites Get DNA Fingerprint Treatment

By | November 4, 2014

Researchers have developed a technique for determining the species of snake responsible for a bite by sequencing genetic material from the fang marks.

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image: Rare Disease to Inform Ebola Susceptibility?

Rare Disease to Inform Ebola Susceptibility?

By | November 4, 2014

Parents of children with the fatal genetic disease Niemann-Pick Type C are taking an active role in research to understand how mutations associated with the disease may protect against Ebola.

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image: Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

By | November 1, 2014

Outsourcing is still the rule and data analysis, the bottleneck.

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image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: Modeling Ebola in Mice

Modeling Ebola in Mice

By | October 30, 2014

A genetically diverse group of mice represents the complete spectrum of human outcomes from Ebola virus infection.

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image: 45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

By | October 24, 2014

The oldest human genome to have been sequenced came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

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image: Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

By | October 23, 2014

Researchers devise a way to preserve bits of paper containing synthetic gene networks, which can be easily stored and widely distributed. Rehydrated, transcription and translation “come to life.”

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image: Lab Shakers: Usage and Trends

Lab Shakers: Usage and Trends

By | October 22, 2014

A survey of The Scientist readers identifies product trends and developments in laboratory shakers.

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image: Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

By | October 21, 2014

Five-thousand years after agricultural practices spread across Neolithic Europe, human populations remained unable to digest sugars from the milk of mammals.

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image: NYC’s Pathogen-Riddled Rats

NYC’s Pathogen-Riddled Rats

By | October 15, 2014

Researchers find more than a dozen brand new viruses lurking in rodents inhabiting the Big Apple.

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