The Scientist

» animal models

Most Recent

The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

0 Comments

While studying the progression of healthy cells into cancerous ones, researchers discover a way to engraft human blood cells into animals.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Canine Models for Alzheimer’s

Opinion: Canine Models for Alzheimer’s

By | March 1, 2017

For research on drugs to treat neurodegenerative diseases, dogs offer a better predictor of clinical outcomes. 

7 Comments

image: Opinion: Reuse and Reduce

Opinion: Reuse and Reduce

By | January 16, 2017

Sharing leftover samples from preclinical experiments is one way biomedical researchers can make the most of animal models.

2 Comments

image: Assessing the Behavior of Lab Animals

Assessing the Behavior of Lab Animals

By | November 1, 2016

Advances in cage design and monitoring software allow the collection of more realistic data.

2 Comments

image: Researchers Grow “Frankenstein Ants” to Study Epigenetics

Researchers Grow “Frankenstein Ants” to Study Epigenetics

By | October 1, 2016

A molecular biologist ventures into entomology to use genetically modified ants as laboratory models of behavioral epigenetics.

1 Comment

image: Zika-Associated Brain Injuries Found in Monkey Fetus

Zika-Associated Brain Injuries Found in Monkey Fetus

By | September 13, 2016

Scientists image fetal brain lesions in a pigtail macaque whose mother was infected with the virus while pregnant.

1 Comment

image: Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?

Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?

By | July 19, 2016

Increasingly sophisticated tissue organoids can model many aspects of disease, but animal studies retain a fundamental role in research, scientists say. 

1 Comment

image: Nonhuman Primate Model of Zika

Nonhuman Primate Model of Zika

By | June 28, 2016

Researchers infect rhesus macaques with the virus to better study its effects in humans.

0 Comments

Exposing male rats to nonionizing radiation increased the animals’ risk of brain and heart tumors in a study, but the findings are far from conclusive.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Government Nixes Teaching Evolution in Turkish Schools
AAAS