The Scientist

» physiology, microbiology and immunology

Most Recent

image: Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

By | June 30, 2015

A new test that scans for the Ebola virus with just a fingerprick could be a practical diagnostic for use in West Africa.

0 Comments

image: Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

By | June 29, 2015

Male and female mice utilize different immune cells to process pain, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Neutralizing HIV

Neutralizing HIV

By | June 18, 2015

Engineered immunogens based on conserved patches of the virus’s envelope protein point to new strategies for vaccine design.

0 Comments

image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

3 Comments

image: New Immunity

New Immunity

By | June 1, 2015

A scaffolding protein forms the hub of a newly identified immune pathway in plants.

0 Comments

image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.

0 Comments

image: WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

By | May 27, 2015

World Health Organization officials endorse a global strategy to combat the spread of antibiotic resistance.

2 Comments

image: Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

By | May 19, 2015

The midwestern U.S. and central Asia are at high risk for new disease outbreaks from pathogen-bearing rodents, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Warm-Blooded Fish

Warm-Blooded Fish

By | May 15, 2015

The opah, or moonfish, is a deep-sea fish that regulates its body temperature more like a mammal than any of its finned kin, researchers have determined.

2 Comments

image: The Dark Side of Light

The Dark Side of Light

By | May 14, 2015

Artificially extended days cause mice to gain fat and alter the function of their brown fat, a study shows.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS