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image: Fruit Fly Flight Tactics

Fruit Fly Flight Tactics

By | April 14, 2014

High-speed cameras capture the remarkable in-flight maneuvers fruit flies use to avoid predators.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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image: <em>BRCA1</em> Linked to Brain Size

BRCA1 Linked to Brain Size

By | March 20, 2014

The breast cancer-associated gene may play a protective role in neural stem cells, a mouse study finds.

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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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