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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

By | June 1, 2017

Researchers could reconstruct the faces a monkey saw from the patterns of neuronal activity in a certain area of the brain.

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image: Bone Marrow Isn’t the Only Source of Platelets

Bone Marrow Isn’t the Only Source of Platelets

By | June 1, 2017

Scientists have estimated that about half of murine platelet production occurs in the lungs.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

By | June 1, 2017

In mice, cells in the prefrontal cortex—where memories are maintained long-term—start to encode a fearful experience right from the start.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: Running on Empty

Running on Empty

By | June 1, 2017

Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

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image: The Search for Methods to Monitor Brain Cooling

The Search for Methods to Monitor Brain Cooling

By | June 1, 2017

Newborns deprived of oxygen have their temperatures lowered to protect against brain damage, but it’s hard to decipher the babies’ immediate response to the intervention.

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