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image: Skin-Deep Immunity

Skin-Deep Immunity

By | February 29, 2012

Immune cells in skin provide powerful protection against infection, suggesting new routes for vaccination.

6 Comments

image: Calcium and the Pancreas

Calcium and the Pancreas

By | February 1, 2012

Normal pancreatic function depends on the precise flow of calcium within and into the acinar cells of the organ. 

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image: Switching the Bait

Switching the Bait

By | February 1, 2012

Turning a standard technique into an unbiased screen for diagnostic biomarkers

6 Comments

image: Immune Heat

Immune Heat

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

3 Comments

image: The War Within

The War Within

By | February 1, 2012

Unraveling the molecular causes of acute pancreatitis—a potentially deadly disease in which the pancreas essentially digests itself—is yielding clues to how it might be treated.

12 Comments

image: Ultrasound Halts Sperm Production

Ultrasound Halts Sperm Production

By | January 30, 2012

Zapping testicles with ultrasound appears to reduce sperm counts to low levels in rats.

3 Comments

image: Caffeine Affects Estrogen Levels

Caffeine Affects Estrogen Levels

By | January 26, 2012

Moderate caffeine intake is associated with higher estrogen levels for Asians, but lower levels for whites.

6 Comments

image: Is India Polio Free?

Is India Polio Free?

By | January 12, 2012

This week will mark the one-year anniversary of the last polio case in the second-most populous country.

6 Comments

image: Chimp Viruses for Human Vaccines

Chimp Viruses for Human Vaccines

By | January 4, 2012

An adenovirus isolated from chimpanzee feces proves more effective than human adenoviruses as a vaccine vector for hepatitis C.

4 Comments

image: No Mo’ Slow Flow

No Mo’ Slow Flow

By | January 1, 2012

Tools and tricks for high-throughput flow cytometry

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