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The Scientist

» physiology, culture and microbiology

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image: DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

By | November 11, 2014

Sequencing study reveals low levels of microbes in lab reagents that can create big problems for some microbiome studies.

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image: Mapping the Human Proteome

Mapping the Human Proteome

By | November 10, 2014

A comprehensive map of human proteins throughout the body identifies the testes as home to the most unique blend of gene products.

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image: The End of Science Sexism?

The End of Science Sexism?

By | November 5, 2014

A study suggests that, at least in US academia, men and women now receive roughly equivalent treatment in the workplace. The scientific community disagrees.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Walking Whales</em>

Book Excerpt from The Walking Whales

By | November 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “Fossils and War,” author J.G.M. “Hans” Thewissen describes the difficulties of conducting field research in a conflict zone.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2014

Leonardo's Brain, The Future of the Brain, Dodging Extinction, and Arrival of the Fittest

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image: The Ever-Transcendent Cell

The Ever-Transcendent Cell

By | November 1, 2014

Deriving physiologic first principles

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image: The Rules of Replication

The Rules of Replication

By | November 1, 2014

Should there be standard protocols for how researchers attempt to reproduce the work of others?

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: 2014 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2014 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2014

This year’s data reveal notable variation in compensation for life scientists working in different fields, sectors, and regions of the world.

3 Comments

image: Neuro-Insights into Holding It

Neuro-Insights into Holding It

By | October 17, 2014

Scientists reveal the neural underpinnings—and muscles tightly linked with—the involuntary flexing of the pelvic floor, which comprises muscles that help us delay urination.

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