Advertisement

The Scientist

» physiology, culture and evolution

Most Recent

image: Indiana Senate Backs Creationism Bill

Indiana Senate Backs Creationism Bill

By | February 2, 2012

Origin of life theories from a wide range of religions may be taught alongside evolution in the state.

52 Comments

image: There and Back Again

There and Back Again

By | February 1, 2012

A new study estimates the number of generations necessary to evolve from mouse-sized to elephantine, and shows that it’s quicker to get small.

9 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Pathological Altruism</em>

Book Excerpt from Pathological Altruism

By | February 1, 2012

In Chapter 1, editors Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, and Michael McGrath introduce the concept of well-intentioned behaviors that go awry.

0 Comments

image: Calcium and the Pancreas

Calcium and the Pancreas

By | February 1, 2012

Normal pancreatic function depends on the precise flow of calcium within and into the acinar cells of the organ. 

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2012

Neurogastronomy, Why Calories Count, The Kitchen as Laboratory, Fear of Food

1 Comment

image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

0 Comments

image: Female Frontrunners

Female Frontrunners

By | February 1, 2012

How to successfully surmount the challenges women face in becoming biotech industry leaders

7 Comments

image: Killing with Kindness

Killing with Kindness

By | February 1, 2012

Studying the evolution of altruistic behaviors reveals how knee-jerk good intentions can backfire.

30 Comments

image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

0 Comments

image: Genghis Jon

Genghis Jon

By | February 1, 2012

By helping Mongolians cultivate an understanding of their native insect fauna, scientists hope to protect the country's unique yet fragile ecosystems.

1 Comment

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Thermo Scientific
Thermo Scientific
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews