The Scientist

» physiology and culture

Most Recent

image: Science Afield

Science Afield

By | February 1, 2012

Portable wet-lab kits allow even soldiers stationed in war zones to earn college science credits.

9 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2012

February 2012's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Sweet and Sour Science

Sweet and Sour Science

By | February 1, 2012

Japanese researchers unravel the mystery of miracle fruit.

18 Comments

image: The War Within

The War Within

By | February 1, 2012

Unraveling the molecular causes of acute pancreatitis—a potentially deadly disease in which the pancreas essentially digests itself—is yielding clues to how it might be treated.

12 Comments

image: Resignations Over AIDS Denial

Resignations Over AIDS Denial

By | January 31, 2012

A member of an Italian journal’s editorial board resigns in protest of a paper denying the link between HIV and AIDs.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Celebrities Pushing Drugs?

Opinion: Celebrities Pushing Drugs?

By | January 30, 2012

Celebrity spokespeople for pharma companies can manipulate the public’s understanding of disease.

30 Comments

image: Ultrasound Halts Sperm Production

Ultrasound Halts Sperm Production

By | January 30, 2012

Zapping testicles with ultrasound appears to reduce sperm counts to low levels in rats.

4 Comments

image: Caffeine Affects Estrogen Levels

Caffeine Affects Estrogen Levels

By | January 26, 2012

Moderate caffeine intake is associated with higher estrogen levels for Asians, but lower levels for whites.

6 Comments

image: A Peer Review Revolution?

A Peer Review Revolution?

By | January 24, 2012

A new social network provides a novel forum for science publishing and peer review.

9 Comments

image: JSTOR For Free

JSTOR For Free

By | January 17, 2012

JSTOR, the online archive of scholarly journal articles, is offering free but limited access to its database.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  2. Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?
  3. Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome
  4. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
RayBiotech