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Synthetic Genomics
Synthetic Genomics

The Scientist

» physiology and cell & molecular biology

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image: Single-Unit Synthetic Ribosome

Single-Unit Synthetic Ribosome

By | July 29, 2015

Scientists build a specialized ribosome with linked subunits that can translate designer transcripts in bacteria.

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image: AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

By | July 24, 2015

Multiple consecutive adenosine nucleotides can cause protein translation machinery to stall on messenger RNAs.

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image: Bone Marrow Makes New Fat Cells

Bone Marrow Makes New Fat Cells

By | July 16, 2015

The origins of adipocytes have been hotly debated, but a human study supports the idea that the bone marrow takes part. 

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image: Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

Calorie-Restricted Yeast Live Longer

By | July 14, 2015

Calorie restriction in the organism extends lifespan, supporting a long-standing view that had been challenged by a study published last year.

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image: Week in Review: June 29–July 3

Week in Review: June 29–July 3

By | July 3, 2015

Sex differences in processing pain; clue in flu vaccine–narcolepsy link found; early antibiotic use affects the gut microbiome; lizard sex determined by genes, then temperature

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image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

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image: Regenerative Cardiomyocytes Found

Regenerative Cardiomyocytes Found

By | June 24, 2015

Specialized cardiac cells in the mouse heart appear to be the long-sought-after proliferative heart cells.

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image: Extra DNA Base Discovered

Extra DNA Base Discovered

By | June 23, 2015

An epigenetic variant of cytosine is stable in the genomes of living mice, suggesting a possible expansion of the DNA alphabet.

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image: The Handedness of Cells

The Handedness of Cells

By | June 17, 2015

Actin—the bones of the cell—has a preference for swirling into a counterclockwise pattern.

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image: Warm-Blooded Fish

Warm-Blooded Fish

By | May 15, 2015

The opah, or moonfish, is a deep-sea fish that regulates its body temperature more like a mammal than any of its finned kin, researchers have determined.

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