The Scientist

» physiology and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Week in Review: June 29–July 3

Week in Review: June 29–July 3

By | July 3, 2015

Sex differences in processing pain; clue in flu vaccine–narcolepsy link found; early antibiotic use affects the gut microbiome; lizard sex determined by genes, then temperature

0 Comments

image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

1 Comment

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

1 Comment

image: Warm-Blooded Fish

Warm-Blooded Fish

By | May 15, 2015

The opah, or moonfish, is a deep-sea fish that regulates its body temperature more like a mammal than any of its finned kin, researchers have determined.

2 Comments

image: The Dark Side of Light

The Dark Side of Light

By | May 14, 2015

Artificially extended days cause mice to gain fat and alter the function of their brown fat, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

0 Comments

image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

By | April 16, 2015

Metabolites produced by gut microbes in mice can affect the animals’ circadian rhythm and metabolism. 

2 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Studies Retracted After UCLA Investigation
  4. Trump Nominates Sam Clovis to Lead USDA Research
AAAS